SGAC Announces the Winner of the 2012 OHB-SGAC Scholarship Award

14 September, 2012

SGAC in collaboration with one of Europe's top satellite developers, OHB AG, announced today the winners of the 2012 OHB-SGAC Scholarship.

 

 

SGAC Announces the Winner of the 2012 OHB-SGAC Scholarship Award

14 September, 2012

SGAC in collaboration with one of Europe's top satellite developers, OHB AG, announced today the winners of the 2012 OHB-SGAC Scholarship. Their biograpies can be found below. Matthew will present his winning idea at the Space Generation Congress. The prizes will cover his travel, hoteling, and registration for the Congress.

The competition asked applicants to describe an innovative idea to handle space debris. "Innovative" could describe a technical aspect of the mission (such as the propulsion system or scientific purpose) or a non-technical aspect (such as multi-lateral, international partnerships or funding methods).

1st Prize winner Matthew A. Noyes (USA)

SGAC in collaboration with one of Europe's top satellite developers, OHB System AG, announced today Matthew A. Noyes the winner of the 2012 OHB-SGAC Scholarship. His biography can be found below. Matthew will present his winning idea at the Space Generation Congress in Naples, Italy. The prize will cover his travel, accommodation, and registration for SGC.

The competition asked applicants to describe innovative ideas to reduce the risk for our space assets due to space debris.

Dr. Rolf Janovsky, Director Space System Studies at OHB System, was member of the judging panel and said:

“The paper presents two new and really innovative ideas to tackle with the debris problem. The first idea discussed, is the use of an electret tether, creating an electrostatic field in the vicinity of the space debris in order to apply a force to the space debris and to manipulate the debris trajectory in a favorable way. The other idea uses a ground based system sending a strong air-vortex into space in order to decelerate the debris particle and to foster its atmospheric re-entry. Both ideas are described and discussed with their pros and cons. The ideas are so innovative that they should be elaborated in more detail with regard to their implementation as a space debris removal system.”

Biography

Matthew NoyesMatthew Noyes is a junior mechanical engineering student at the University of Rochester in Rochester, New York. Born and raised in small-town America, he developed a passion for science, engineering and space during childhood summers spent building robots and stargazing with family in northern Virginia. Throughout his academic career he has held internships with Northrop Grumman Corporation, NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, a Washington, DC venture equity/tech firm and most recently, NASA’s Johnson Space Center, where he currently holds a co-operative education work-study. His work for the space industry includes ground control software development, 3D iPhone/iPad software, virtual window/head-tracking displays and robotic systems technology. In his spare time he enjoys volunteering for outreach programmes to enhance young interest in STEM careers. He also enjoys amateur astronomy and filmmaking.

Matthew's reaction, “The nature of space exploration has changed. As programmes like the ISS have shown, geographically unhindered collaboration is paramount to our future success. This award affords me the privilege to both share new ideas with the international community, and to present their worldly views to NASA colleagues back home. I am honoured to wield that asset in our joint search for truth.”

2nd Prize winner Olubunmi Emmenuel Akinwumi (Nigeria)

Dr. Rolf Janovsky, Director Space System Studies at OHB System, was member of the judging panel and said:

“Mr. Akinwumi proposed to use a bio-chemical way to reduce the risks due to space debris, namely by using microorganisms capable to absorb the materials of the satellites at the end of life of the spacecraft. This idea basically works only for newly designed spacecraft, however, it might be an interesting alternative to remove spacecraft from their orbits at the end of their life.”

Biography

Olubunmi Emmenuel AkinwumiAkinwumi, Olubunmi Emmenuel, is an undergraduate student of Meteorology in the fourth year from the Federal University of Technology, Akure, Ondo State, Nigeria. He is currently doing an internship at the National Space Research and Development Agency, Abuja, Nigeria for the period of six months. He hails from Afao Ekiti, Ekiti state, Nigeria.

Olubunmi's reaction, "I was happy when I saw the scholarship winning notification to attend the SGC 2012. I was really excited and the joy in me is not measureable at the moment. I have always wanted to be involved in solving global problems and this Scholarship award is like a dream coming through for me. I am also very grateful to SGAC and OHB for the great opportunity given to me to demonstrate my readiness to helping to solve these problems."

Other members of the jury included:

  • Dr. Annette Froehlich, European Space Policy Institute/German Aerospace Center (DLR)
  • Dr. Fritz Merkle, Member of the management board OHB System
  • Andreas Hornig, Winner of the SGAC-Scholarship Award 2011
  • Brian Weeden, SGAC – SSS Group Advisor
  • Shannon Ryan, SGAC – SSS Group Advisor


© 2006-2018   Space Generation Advisory Council  |  info@spacegeneration.org