SGC 2015

Space Generation Congress 2015

Tweetup: Discovery


This year, the Space Generation Advisory Council and the World Space Week Association will be partnering to close out World Space Week 2015 and the 14th Space Generation Congress (SGC) by hosting a Tweetup.

Hosted on 10 October, 2015, the tweetup will focus on the WSW's theme "Discovery", and will feature a panel to discuss the theme's importance in the space sector. The tweetup will be live-streamed to both the SGAC and WSWA's global networks with opportunities for attendees and members of the international community to submit their questions or comments via Twitter.

Venue   Bloomfield Science Museum (SGC Venue located 1.3km from the IAC venue)
Date 10 October, 2015 (Saturday)
Time 16:15 - 17:30 (UTC+03:00)

Get connected! Tweet your questions to the panelists by using the event hashtag #SGC_WSW2015 

Twitter: @SGAC and @WorldSpaceWeek #SGC2015 #WSW2015

 

Panel

Yoav Landsman (Moderator)

Principal Systems Engineer
R&D, Google Lunar XPrize Israel 

Yoav is a graduated aerospace engineer and holds a Masters in geophysics and planetary sciences. He gained his experience in engineering when he worked as a satellite chief systems engineer and as a satellite operations engineer for the Israeli Aerospace Industries.

Yoav is also a talented lecturer, and talks about space technologies, sciences, history and future. He writes a blog and hosts a live internet show, both about space (in Hebrew).

 

 

Victoria Alonsoperez (Panelist)
Entrepreneur
Chair, Space Generation Advisory Council

Victoria is an Electronic, Telecommunications and Electrical Engineer. In 2013 she co-founded IEETECH, a social enterprise that developed Chipsafer, a platform that can track cattle remotely and autonomously. Thanks to Chipsafer in 2012 she was the winner of the International Telecommunications Union Young Innovators Competition and in 2013 she won the Best Young Inventor Award from the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). In 2014 the Inter-American Development Bank selected IEETech as the Most Innovative Startup of Latin America and the Caribbean and the MIT Technology Review Spanish Edition selected me as the Innovator of the Year.

In 2011, Victoria attended International Space University, where she co-designed a medical experiment for astronauts that won the Barcelona ZeroG Challenge. Victoria is currently Chair of Space Generation Advisory Council, a global NGO in support of the United Nations Programme on Space Applications and she is co-managing editor of a small satellite programs book that is part of the US Air Force Academy’s Space Technology Series. 

 

Dennis Stone (Panelist)
President
World Space Week

Dennis Stone is Volunteer President of the World Space Week Association. He cofounded and led the organization, then Spaceweek National Headquarters, in 1982 when it coordinated Spaceweek. As Spaceweek International Association, it then spread the event to 15 nations. After the UN’s declaration of World Space Week in 1999, Mr. Stone led efforts to combine forces with the UN. This set the stage for World Space Week to grow into largest space event in the world, now with over 1,500 events in 72 nations. Today, as its chief executive, he manages the Association’s professional staff and chairs its executive committee.

Mr. Stone has 30 years’ experience at NASA, where he is presently Project Executive of NASA’s Commercial Space Capabilities Office at the Johnson Space Center, providing NASA expertise to the commercial space industry. Previously he helped manage NASA’s successful Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) program, which invested in capabilities of SpaceX and Orbital Sciences to deliver cargo to the International Space Station (ISS). Prior to COTS, Mr. Stone had two decades of program management and system engineering experience at NASA, including as Chief System Engineer of the Assured Crew Return Vehicle, Manager of ISS Avionics Integration, ISS Risk Management Lead, and ISS Commercialization Working Group Chair.

He began his career at McDonnell Douglas designing software for the commercial Payload Assist Module, and then worked at Ford Aerospace and Rockwell International supporting JSC before joining NASA.

He earned two Bachelor of Science degrees, in Physics and Electrical Engineering, from the University of Hawaii. He is an Associate Fellow of the AIAA.

 

Kendra Toole (Panelist)
Systems Engineer
Orbital Sciences

Kendra is a systems engineer at Orbital ATK working in telecommunications satellites. Previously, she was a launch engineer for the Antares launch vehicle supporting from performance testing through demo flight, and two Commercial Resupply Service (CRS) missions. Prior to her launch experience on Antares, Kendra worked at SpaceX in launch pad ground systems. 

Kendra began her career as an intern at the Space Frontier Foundation and is passionate about expanding the space industry into developing economies and educating the next generation of explorers. Kendra is the recipient of the 'Lisa La Bonte Innovative Space Education International Award’

 

Prof. Tsvi Piran (Panelist)
Astrophysicist
Hebrew University of Jerusalem 

Prof. Piran is an Israeli theoretical physicist and astrophysicist, best known for his work on Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) and on numerical relativity.

At a time when most astronomers believed that GRBs were galactic with Eichler, Livio and Schramm, Piran proposed that GRBs originate from cosmological neutron star binary mergers, a model that is generally accepted today. During the early nineties when the cosmological vs. galactic debate took place, Piran was one of the strongest and most vocal proponents of cosmological origin, which was confirmed in 1997 with the discovery of cosmological redshifts from GRB's afterglow. 

Before working on GRBs, Piran made important contributions to numerical relativity, the numerical solution of Einstein's equations. In 1985 he wrote the first numerical code calculating the collapse and formation of a rotating black hole and the resulting gravitational radiation waveform. In addition to these works, Piran's contributions range over a selection of problems in Relativistic Astrophysics. He demonstrated the critical dependence of the stability of accretion disks on the cooling and heating mechanisms. Piran was the first to point out that inflation is a generic phenomenon involving any scalar field (without requiring a specific potential) and, in particular, that this is so for a free massive scalar field. He went on later to show that, in fact, the onset of inflation is not fully generic and it requires specific initial conditions, a concept whose full implications have not been addressed up to now. He was the first to suggest and show that cosmic biasing depends on galaxy types and that different galaxies are distributed differently in the Universe. This is a concept that seems obvious today but was controversial when proposed in the late eighties. Piran's work includes also contributions to the general theory of relativity such as one of the strongest counter examples to the cosmic censorship hypothesis and the demonstration of the instability of the inner structure of a black hole.

In addition to Piran's work as an astrophysicist, he has served from 2005 until 2009 as the dean of the Hebrew University School of Business Administration. During this term he has made revisions in the school.

is an Israeli theoretical physicist and astrophysicist, best known for his work on Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) and on numerical relativity.

At a time when most astronomers believed that GRBs were galactic with Eichler, Livio and Schramm, Piran proposed that GRBs originate from cosmological neutron star binary mergers, a model that is generally accepted today. During the early nineties when the cosmological vs. galactic debate took place, Piran was one of the strongest and most vocal proponents of cosmological origin, which was confirmed in 1997 with the discovery of cosmological redshifts from GRB's afterglow. 

Before working on GRBs, Piran made important contributions to numerical relativity, the numerical solution of Einstein's equations. In 1985 he wrote the first numerical code calculating the collapse and formation of a rotating black hole and the resulting gravitational radiation waveform. In addition to these works, Piran's contributions range over a selection of problems in Relativistic Astrophysics. He demonstrated the critical dependence of the stability of accretion disks on the cooling and heating mechanisms. Piran was the first to point out that inflation is a generic phenomenon involving any scalar field (without requiring a specific potential) and, in particular, that this is so for a free massive scalar field. He went on later to show that, in fact, the onset of inflation is not fully generic and it requires specific initial conditions, a concept whose full implications have not been addressed up to now. He was the first to suggest and show that cosmic biasing depends on galaxy types and that different galaxies are distributed differently in the Universe. This is a concept that seems obvious today but was controversial when proposed in the late eighties. Piran's work includes also contributions to the general theory of relativity such as one of the strongest counter examples to the cosmic censorship hypothesis and the demonstration of the instability of the inner structure of a black hole.

In addition to Piran's work as an astrophysicist, he has served from 2005 until 2009 as the dean of the Hebrew University School of Business Administration. During this term he has made revisions in the school.

 

What's a Tweetup?

A Tweet Up is an organised, in-person gathering of people on Twitter. Tweetups are often organised for groups of people with similar interests as a way to bring them together. Twitter is used to disseminate information about the event.

The word "Tweetup" is an amalgamation of the words "tweet" and "meet up" and is exclusively used in relation to the social networking site Twitter. Tweetups have become an integral part of social engineering and are being actively used by marketers to let people know of their products, increase awareness and build hype. 

As people become more and more social on the Internet, Tweet Ups are likely to become more prevalent. 

 

Impact

This event will be an international event promoted to:

  • The WSWA and SGAC network as the culmination of WSW 2015
  • Space communities worldwide
  • Live streamed to WSW events worldwide in over 80 nations 
  • The audience will be made up of almost 200 people from all over the world as well as SGC 2015 delegates

 

About World Space Week

World Space Weeks is a United Nations declared event held every year from 4 - 10 October that is celebrated in a variety of ways by educational institutions, aerospace companies, and astronomy clubs. The event is a global celebration of science and technology, and the ways they have improved the human condition. The event dates were chosen to honour the launch of Sptunik I (4 October, 1957), the first satellite in orbit paving the way for space exploration, and the signing of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, Including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies (10 October, 1967).

Space Generation Congress 2015

How to Launch Your Career in Space Panel


 

Space Generation Advisory Council,
Airbus Defence and Space and 
IAF Global Networking Forum
present
How to Launch Your Career in Space” 

 

Panelists from the SGAC/IAC GNF Panel in 2014

Date: Wednesday, 14 October, 2015

Time: 14:30 - 15:30

Place: IAF Global Networking Forum at the IAC Jerusalem International Convention Centre (ICC)

Audience: Open to all IAC delegates

Moderator: Ms. Jillianne Pierce, Space Generation Advisory Council

 

 
 
Preliminary Description of the SGAC/IAC GNF Panel

The panel will offer advice for young professionals looking to enter or advance within the space industry, drawing from the personal experiences of senior leaders in the field. The discussion will focus on creative ways to gain insight and experience, while learning how to identify opportunities for advancement.

Specific questions will be posed to each panellist relevant to their background in the space sector.

Sample questions include:

  • In your experience what are the benefits of pursing an entry-level job at a space company vs. a more specialized role in an unrelated field to gain experience that I can later transfer into the space sector?
  • Apart from skills related to the job, what characteristics do you think prospective employers look for in candidates?
  • How do I find and keep a mentor/mentee relationship and when is it okay to “mentor up”?

 

Jillianne Pierce (Moderator)
Space Generation Advisory Council
Government Affairs Associate, Space Foundation

 In her position as Government Affairs Associate for the Space Foundation, Jillianne Pierce regularly interfaces with the United States Congress, the Administration, and various federal and international departments and agencies to educate key decision-makers on issues of importance in the space policy arena. A member of the Florida bar and the International Institute of Space Law, Jillianne earned a J.D. from the University of Miami and a B.A. from the University of Central Florida. She currently resides in Washington, D.C., where she is regularly spotted on the metro carrying lightsabers and model rockets.

 

  

Prof. Dr. Pascale Ehrenfreund (Panelist)
Chair, Executive Board
Deutschen Zentrums für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR)

Pascale Ehrenfreund has been Chair of the DLR Executive Board since 17 August 2015.

Born in 1960, Ehrenfreund obtained degrees in Astronomy and Biology at the University of Vienna, where she also earned her doctorate in 1990. Ehrenfreund was appointed as a Fellow of the European Space Agency (ESA) at the Leiden Observatory in the Netherlands, upon completion of her doctoral studies.

She was awarded an APART fellowship from the Austrian Academy of Sciences (from 1996 to 1999), which she used to complete her professorial thesis, ‘Cosmic Dust’, at the University of Vienna.

Between 2001 and 2005, Ehrenfreund held a professorship in Astrobiology at the University of Amsterdam and the University of Leiden, where she remains a Visiting Professor today. In addition, between 2005 and 2008 she was a Distinguished Visiting Scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, USA, which is part of the California Institute of Technology.

Ehrenfreund obtained a Master of Arts in Management and Leadership in 2008. Since then, she has been Professor of Space Policy and International Affairs at the Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University, and Lead Investigator at the NASA Astrobiology Institute.

She accepted the honorary position of President of the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) in 2013, from which she stepped down upon her appointment at DLR. Ehrenfreund is married with two children.

 

Elizabeth Seward (Panelist)
Head of Marketing, Earth Observation, Navigation & Science
Airbus Defence and Space

Liz Seward works for Airbus Defence and Space in the Business Development team of the Earth Observation, Navigation and Science department, as Head of the Marketing team. It is a transnational role, with responsibilities and team members in France, Germany and the UK.

Liz received an MPhys degree in Physics with Space Science & Technology from the University of Leicester and started working for Airbus after graduation. Her first job was as a Thermal Engineer and followed by a move into the future programmes group as a Mission Systems Engineer working on projects such as the first study for the ExoMars rover.

Liz moved into technical communications after completing a Media Fellowship run by the British Science Association, working at the BBC for two months in a scheme to improve how scientists & engineers work with the media.

 

Kevin Stube (Panelist)
Advisory Board
The Planetary Society

Kevin Stube serves as a contractor at the NASA Ames Research Center as the Program Manager for the Exploration Technology Directorate.

Kevin sees peaceful exploration and settlement of space as a priority for humanity, but this is difficult in the current economic difficulties of the world. He supports a dynamic international cooperative including government, commercial, private, and advocacy groups such as the Planetary Society, helps reduce the cost of space exploration and improve the economy.

Kevin Stube has followed a passion for space since he was ten years old and received a poster of the Hubble Space Telescope his future stepfather brought back from the 38th IAC. Kevin received a Masters Degree in Space Studies and a Masters in Business Administration and Project Management. He has also studied doctoral level planetary science at the University of Arizona. Kevin was a member of the TESS mission proposal team and test support engineer for the TEGA instrument of the Mars Phoenix Mission.

Kevin Stube helped start the first, and all subsequent, IAF Young Professionals Programme at the IAC. He has taken part in organizing the Next Generation Plenaries at the past three IACs and the IAC in Naples. Kevin serves on several IAF committees. He is the Chair of the IAF Workforce Development and Young Professionals Programme Committee and a member of the IAF Technical Advisory Committee for the Cultural Uses of Space (ITTACUS), and the Entrepreneurship and Investment Committee as well as a member of several award selection panels for the past 8 years. Kevin is also a member of the Advisory Board of the Planetary Society and served in several positions in the Space Generation Advisory Council between 2004 and 2009.

 

Dr. Bernard Foing (Panelist)
Chair
ESTEC Staff Association Committee

Born in France, Bernard Foing has a PhD in Astrophysics and Space Techniques. He worked 3 years in Chile as an astronomer for the European Southern Observatory (ESO), the French embassy, and as Professor of Astrophysics. A researcher at French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) since 1986, Foing obtained the Habilitation for direction of research in 1990. At ESA since 1993, he is Senior Research Coordinator at the Research and Scientific Support Department. He was president of ILEWG in 1998-2000 and now is their Executive Director.

 

 

Giampietro Tonoli (Panelist)
Space Generation Advisory Council
MSc Fellow, Airbus Defence and Space

Giampietro Tonoli is a Master Student in Industrial Engineering at the Technical University of Brunswick, Germany. During his Master studies he worked at the German Aerospace Center as a student assistant in the DLR School Lab Braunschweig, where he helped inspiring and motivating teenagers to get involved in science and engineering. He earned a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering at the Politecnico di Milano, Italy in 2013. Giampietro joined SGAC in 2014 after participating at the SpaceUp in Bremen, Germany. His interests in space are the international project management, lean processes and science application. On this last topic Giampietro is writing his Master Thesis, developing a science experiment for the ISS at Airbus Defence and Space. Mr. Tonoli has many years of international experience due to volunteer activities and student jobs abroad.

Space Generation Congress 2015

Space Operations Workshop


 

Applications for Space Operations Workshop are now open!

Click on the link and follow the application instructions:  REGISTER HERE

The deadline for registration is 30 September, 2015 Deadline extended: 7 October, 2015 (23:59 UTC).  

 

Do you want to learn how to carry out space operations for big satellites and cubesats? Or what the difference is in operating various complex missions? By participating in the SGAC Space Operations Workshop in Jerusalem, you will have the opportunity to learn about three different approaches to space operations: the large agency approach, the commercial operator approach, and the small company approach.

During this workshop, participants will learn about the different philosophies behind the operations of these three approaches, as well as the complexity of the satellites, and how contributions from private or European Member States are managed.

EUMETSAT will be representing the Agency point of view, Telespazio VEGA Deutschland GmbH will represent the commercial point of view, and the Group of Astrodynamics for the Use of Space Systems will represent the small company point of view.

After the lectures by each representative, all participants will be assigned to a team and will have a chance to design their own mission. The teams will follow the guidelines provided by the experts in order to design missions which meet their appropriate criteria. The missions will then be given constructive criticism, and lessons learned will be explained to the participants.

The workshop is open to students and young professionals. If you aspire to work for a company, an international space agency, or if you are interested in starting your own satellite operations company, then this five-hour workshop is a great opportunity to learn about the challenges and excitement of space operations.

   

 

Workshop Schedule

Date: Sunday 11 October, 2015
Location: The Jerusalem International Convention Center (ICC)Room 302-303 from 11:00 to 16:00

 11:00 - 11:45 

 “Agency” operations by EUMETSAT (30 min) 

 Question period (15 mins)

11:45 - 12:30

 “Small” operations by Gauss srl (30 mins)

 Question period (15 mins)

12:30 - 13:15

“Industry support” to operations by TZPV (30 mins)

Question period (15 mins)

13:15 - 14:00

 Lunch break

14:00 - 15:00

 Team work session

15:00 - 15:30

Discussion of the team work

15:30 - 15:45

Introduction to SpaceOps

15:45 - 16:00

Wrap-Up

Sean Burns
EUMETSAT

Sean Burns is the Head of the Real-Time Services and System Operations Division at EUMETSAT, the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites. Sean holds degrees in Mathematics and Computing, System Engineering, and also a Masters in Business Administration.

Sean has been involved in the operations of Meteorological Satellites for over 28 years. He has worked in all areas of satellite and ground segment operations, and most recently has been involved in defining the operations concepts for the next generation of meteorological satellites. He is a member of the SpaceOps organisation, and is passionate about sharing his space operations knowledge to students and young professionals.

 

Ran Qedar
Telespazio VEGA Deutschland GmbH

Ran Qedar, originally from Israel, graduated in 2009 from the Technion with a BSc in Aerospace, with a specialization in spacecraft and systems engineering. Ran worked for three years in the Israeli Aerospace Industries (IAI) as a spacecraft operations engineer for LEO missions. During this time he participated in a LEO launch, as commissioner and special operations. 

In 2012, Ran moved to Europe to study a masters in space systems engineering at TU Delft. During this time he worked at the university ground station during the launch of TU Delft's second satellite, Delfi-n3Xt.

Ran is currently working as a spacecraft operations engineer for TELESPAZIO VEGA Deutschland at the European Space Operation Center (ESOC) on the deep space galaxy observer known as GAIA.

 
Chantal Capelletti 
Group of Astrodynamics for the Use of Space Systems

Chantal Cappelletti was born in Roma, Italia in 1980. She received her BSc (2005), MSc (2008), and PhD in Aerospace Engineering (2012) from the School of Aerospace Engineering of Sapienza University of Roma.

From 2009 to 2012 Chantal was a visiting scholar at Morehead State university in Kentucky. Her main activities deal with space debris detection, microsatellites missions, and aerospace biomedical experiments. She designed and manufactured the first Italian space debris observatory.

Chantal was project manager of the Italian satellites EduSat, launched in 2011, UniCubeSat-GG, launched in 2012, UniSat-5, launched in 2013, and Brazilian Satellite SERPENS that will be deployed from the ISS. Recently she has joined the aerospace team at the University of Brasilia as an Associate Professor of the Aerospace Engineering course, being one of the founding member of the Laboratory for Application and Innovation in Aerospace Sciences at UnB. She is a corresponding member of the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA).

Space Generation Congress 2015

The Closing Gala Dinner


The popular Space Generation Congress Closing (SGC) Gala Dinner once again opens its door to the space community this year. The annual Space Generation Congress (SGC) Gala Dinner will be held in Jerusalem, Israel on the 10th October, 2015. The event is the culmination of the three days of hard work done at the 14th Space Generation Congress by the delegates, with keynote speakers from space agencies, industry, and academia.

Fantastic entertainment, traditional Israeli cuisine, and an electric atmosphere will make an unforgettable night celebrating the next generation of space leaders. Students and young professionals will join industry professionals, including heads of agencies. 

 

How can I attend as guest?

Due to the overwhelming interest in the 14th Space Generation Congress in Jerusalem, SGAC is happy to welcome more SGC delegates than expected. Due to capacity limits on the SGC Gala Dinner venue, we are unfortunately unable to accommodate further gala dinner guests at this point.

NOTE: The gala dinner is included for 2015 Space Generation Congress delegates who are confirmed attendees and have paid for their registration.

For further details and information, please contact the SGC Gala Dinner Organiser, Esta dirección de correo electrónico está siendo protegida contra los robots de spam. Necesita tener JavaScript habilitado para poder verlo..

 

Closing Gala Dinner Details

This events of the evening will be held at the Belgium House in Jerusalem, inside the Hebrew University, on the Saturday 10th October, 2015.

The evening will begin at 8:00pm with a reception, where appetizers and beverages will be served. Guests will have the opportunity to network with delegates, speakers, and invited guests, while enjoying music and photographs/videos of SGC highlights. 

The gala dinner will begin at 9:00pm, featuring local cuisine. 

Official website of the Belgium House 

Distance from Bloomfield Science Museum: 950m

Distance from International Conference Center: 1.8km

Address of the Belgium House: Giv'at Ram Campus, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 

Space Generation Congress 2015

SGAC Young Space Leaders Scholarship


A main goal of the Space Generation Congress is to provide firsthand international perspectives of today's space sector. SGAC is enabling this through its Young Space Leaders Scholarship. Top international applicants will be selected to attend the Space Generation Congress and the 66nd International Astronautical Congress. Winners must be SGAC members between the ages of 18-35 (it's free and easy - become an SGAC member). The Scholarship will cover round trip travel to Jerusalem, lodging, visa costs, and the registration fees for both the Space Generation Congress and International Astronautical Congress.

The winners of the Young Space Leaders Scholarship will be tasked with the opportunity to participate as a Working Group moderator or rapporteur, and are expected to take an active role in the topic preparation.

 

How to Apply

  1. To apply for the Young Space Leaders Scholarship, please fill out an application form for the Space Generation Congress. 
  2. At the bottom of the application form, please check the box indicating that you are applying for the SGAC Young Space Leaders Scholarship.
  3. By 31 July 2015, submit your application for the SGAC Young Space Leaders Scholarship to Michal Kunes (Esta dirección de correo electrónico está siendo protegida contra los robots de spam. Necesita tener JavaScript habilitado para poder verlo.).
  4. Your Application should include the following: One page letter of intent, CV with date of birth and head shot photo. 

Applications will not be considered complete until your letter of intent and CV are received. The winners will be selected based on their Space Generation Congress application, letter of intent, CV as well as experience and background to the Working Group topics.


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