• 16th Space Generation Congress

16th Space Generation Congress

Working Groups


During the 2017 Space Generation Congress, delegates will participate in Working Groups led by moderators and including subject matter experts and a keynote speaker. The outcome of the discussions will be compiled into a report and presented at IAC 2017, UNCOPUOS, and other global conferences.

 


Working Group 1: Space Exploration

Expanding global partnerships off earth

Kindly sponsored by NASA Advanced Exploration Systems

 

SUMMARY

With the 2020s rapidly approaching, space agencies and private companies around the world are preparing for bold new missions on and around the moon. Great potential exists for collaborative partnerships to advance science, technology and our understanding of the solar system. With combined infrastructures throughout cislunar space, what opportunities might be available for governments, industry, academia and private citizens to become active participants in deep space? To further refine this concept, this working group will focus on the utilization of deep space capabilities that will be available in the 2020s, based on current mission plans that have been announced by space agencies and private companies. Participants representing the aerospace industry or space agencies should be prepared to share the technology goals, capability objectives and commercial strategies on behalf of their employers. Capability objectives could include launch, habitation, power and propulsion, mobility, tools, ISRU, communications, robotics, and more.

 

Moderators: Nicole Hermann (NASA AES), Joao Lousada (SGAC)

Rapporteur: Ryan Joyce

Topic Keynote Speaker: Jason Crusan (NASA AES)

Subject Matter Expert: Erin Mahoney (NASA AES)
 


Working Group 2: Space Policy

Space Resources Governance

Kindly sponsored by Secure World Foundation
 

SUMMARY

Increased access to outer space and the expected demand for resources both on Earth and in space have led to the awareness that resources matter, even those beyond our planet. The recent mushrooming of commercial ventures and state-driven projects dedicated to space resource utilisation is testament to this observation. With such advances and endeavours comes the pressing need to assess the governance framework for space resources. In response to the increasing importance of space resources utilisation, the UNCOPUOS Legal Subcommittee has included considerations on the topic as an agenda item. Moreover, the Hague Space Resources Governance Working Group (SRGWG) was set up in December 2014 to address the lack of a governance framework. There is near consensus among stakeholders that the governance framework should ensure that space resources are gathered and utilised in a peaceful and sustainable manner and that legal certainty for investors, explorers and miners is imperative. This working group will assess space resources governance and make suggestions to address the challenges.

 

Moderator: Caroline Thro (SGAC/ESA)

Rapporteur: TBD

Topic Keynote Speaker: TBD

Subject Matter Expert: TBD

 


Working Group 3: Space Law

Outer Space Treaty

Kindly sponsored by Defence Science and Technology Group, Australian Department of Defence

 

SUMMARY

In 1967, when the Outer Space Treaty (OST) was created, it was a beacon of hope for the future regulation of Outer Space, articulating aspirations to guide us as we went beyond the horizon to the great expanse of space. At the same time the OST reflected the reality of competing interests and concerns of rival nuclear superpowers. While a product of its time, the OST remains the foundational legal document that governs all of humanity’s activities in space. As we approach the OST’s 50th anniversary, the broad statements and principles in the OST that have served us well in the past must be further defined to meet the challenges of  global space governance that we will face over the next 50 years. Attempts to provide more detail and greater clarity to the OST will be contentious. Supplementing the OST must balance the “province of mankind” principle and humanity’s emerging needs against the politics of State interests. Any proposed supplementation must be both achievable in the near term and meaningful. The proposals should be applicable today and many years from now. Overall, this working group will assess how the OST can be adapted for the next generation to enjoy the benefits of space over the next 50 years.

 

Moderators: Tyson Lange

Rapporteur: TBD

Topic Keynote Speaker: David Kendall

Subject Matter Expert: TBD

 


Working Group 4: Space Innovation

Lunar Commercialization

 

SUMMARY

Building a future on another celestial body requires bold and innovative ideas. In the Lunar Commercialization Working Group, SGC delegates will focus on identifying near to mid term commercial lunar development opportunities and activities enabled by getting to the lunar surface, setting the stage for a potential lunar settlement after the end-of-ISS operations in the mid-2020s. To drive the future, SGC Delegates will brainstorm Science-Exploration-Commercial synergies and will explore potential markets, business models, and incentive structures that can enable a permanent lunar settlement  in the next ten years.

 

Moderators: Josef Wiedemann (DLR)

Rapporteur: TBD

Topic Keynote Speaker: TBD

Subject Matter Expert: TBD

 


Working Group 5: Space Transportation

 

SUMMARY

The commercial space transportation industry is on the cusp of significant growth. There is increased demand for launch services underpinned by funded plans for satellite constellations, interest from emerging space nations and the falling cost of building satellites. At the same time, the rise of innovative launch methods and approaches instill confidence that supply of launch access to space would remain reliable and competitive. To add icing to the cake, in 2015, the United States government enacted legislation committing to defer further regulation of the commercial space transportation industry until 2023. The intent behind this move is to give the industry more time to develop without the constraint of government regulation. Overall, this working group would assess the space transportation landscape, examine the challenges facing the industry and discuss potential solutions.

 

Moderators: Matthew Richardson (JAXA)

Rapporteur: TBD

Topic Keynote Speaker: Clay Mowry (Blue Origin)

Subject Matter Expert: Justin Hardi (DLR);

 


Working Group 6: Space Technologies

Laser Space Communications

Kindly sponsored by NASA Space Communications and Navigation

 

SUMMARY

Laser communications, also known as optical communications, are believed to be one of the latest game changing space technologies. Laser communications would be able to provide data rates of as much as a hundred times higher than current systems. NASA SCaN and its partners are working to revolutionise the way astronauts communicate to and from space using an advanced laser communications system called LEMNOS, which will enable exponentially faster connections than ever before. NASA has already conducted the Lunar Laser Communications Demonstration (LLCD) in 2013, and is planning to launch the Laser Communications Relay Demonstration (LCRD) to geostationary orbit in 2019, followed by the Deep Space Optical Communications terminal on the Discovery Psyche mission in 2022.  This working group will explore common standards to enable interoperability between laser communication systems.

 

Moderators: Jillian Yuricich

Rapporteur: TBD

Topic Keynote Speaker: TBD

Subject Matter Expert: Kate Becker (NOAA);


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