• SGx 2017
    SGx 2017

    SGx 2017 will be held 9 March, 2017 in Washington DC, USA! Visit the event page to learn more.

  • Poland Mars Analogue Simulation 2017
    Poland Mars Analogue Simulation 2017

    Find out how you can get involved with and support SGAC’s first Mars Analogue Mission! Visit the PMAS 2017 Page!

  • 2nd European Space Generation Workshop
    2nd European Space Generation Workshop

    "Welcome to the city of light where you can grow, learn and network". Read more information here!

  • Space Generation Fusion Forum 2017
    Space Generation Fusion Forum 2017

    SGFF is an affiliated event of the 33rd Space Symposium held April 2&3 in Colorado Springs, USA!

  • 16th Space Generation Congress
    16th Space Generation Congress

    The SGC 2017 will be held in Adelaide, Australia this year! More information to come.

  • SGAC Opportunities, Scholarships and Vacancies
    SGAC Opportunities, Scholarships and Vacancies

    Start building your leadership skills and professional career in the space sector with SGAC from HERE!

ABOUT SGAC

The Space Generation Advisory Council is a global non-governmental, non-profit (US 501(c)3) organisation and network which aims to represent university students and young space professionals to the United Nations, space agencies, industry, and academia.

 

 

Upcoming Events

2017

6 Mar: SGx
24-25 Mar: 2017 E-SGW
27 Mar-7 Apr: UN COPUOS Legal Subcommittee
2-3 April: Space Generation Fusion Forum
7-16 Jun: 
UN Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space
June: SG[Kuwait]*
July: Poland Mars Analogue Simulation

* More information TBA

Background The Search Campaign How to Apply and Requirements Key Dates FAQs

 

The Search Campaign

IASC LogoSelected teams will receive an info pack about the software to be used and other details on how to get ready for the Search Campaign.

The Search Campaign itself will last for five weeks from 14 August - 18 September, 2012. Typically your team will get 3-5 image sets per week. This is an average depending upon factors such as the Moon and weather. It takes about 20 minutes to analyse one set. This means you can expect an average workload of 1.5 - 2.5 hours per week. The image analysis is done with Astrometrica, an easy to use software package provided by IASC.

Each team could consist of SGAC members from different countries, and they would collaborate as a research team via the internet, submitting a single MPC (Minor Planet Center) report to IASC on each of the image sets that they get during a week. A team working over the internet will probably rotate the responsibility of analyzing a set then share their work with the others on the team for comment. IASC will generally wait four days for the teams to process one set, so there's ample time for the team members to collaborate. IASC then links their measurements to the official report that IASC's data reduction group prepares. Although if the teams respond very quickly (e.g., within 24 hours or less) their measurements can be included directly in the IASC reports, and in some cases resulting in their being published by the MPC or even on rare occasion, the International Astronomical Union (IAU).

In case you discover an asteroid, you will receive further information. A discovery has to be observed a second time within 7-10 days. At that point it is given a provisional designation by the Minor Planet Center. In 3-6 years as additional observations are made and the orbit is fully determined, the asteroid is numbered and placed into the world's official minor planets catalog by the International Astronomical Union. Numbered asteroids can be named by their discoverers.

After the Search Campaign you are asked to submit a short report to SGAC about your experience.


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