SA-SGW 2016

Current Sponsors

 

Consejo Nacional de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Tecnológica

https://portal.concytec.gob.pe

Cienciactiva

Becas y Co-financiamiento de Concytec

http://www.cienciactiva.gob.pe/

 

Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú

www.pucp.edu.pe

 

Florida Institute of Technology

www.fit.edu

 

Merck

www.merck.com

 

Biomakers Lab Peru

Centro de Ciencia, Cultura, y Liderazgo

 

Support the Event

If you would like to support and/or participate in the event, we're offering booths during the main event and support packages. If you wish to donate any amount or get a booth, please contact either the event manager Bruno Sarli (该Email地址已收到反垃圾邮件插件保护。要显示它您需要在浏览器中启用JavaScript。) or the event co-manager Gabriel Lapilli (该Email地址已收到反垃圾邮件插件保护。要显示它您需要在浏览器中启用JavaScript。).      

Our activities would not be possible without the support of partners and donors. The value of your contribution in empowering students and young professionals around to world is significant. In order to allow us to continue to facilitate dialogue and thought between students and young professionals on international space policy, provide them with the necessary financial resources to participate in international discussions on space, and to carry out relevant project work, we are looking for partners and supporters!

SGAC is proud to be hosting the SA-SGW16 in association with the 1st Latin American Congress on Astrobiology, making this the 1st Peruvian Space Week. Make sure you check the website for both events too: http://www.psw2016.com/

This page will give you some useful information concerning the South American Space Generation Workshop (SA-SWG16), in order to facilitate your planning and to encourage your participation.

You can be sure it will be worth it!

 

How do I secure my spot at SA-SGW 2016?

Step 1: Apply online

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Step 2: SGAC reviews your application for approval/denial

Step 3: If your application is approved, you will receive a confirmation email with more details on how to secure your place for SA-SGW 2016

Admissions are rolling. This means applications are reviewed as they come in. The sooner you apply, the sooner your application will be reviewed for approval, the sooner you can secure your AP-SGW, and start making your travel arrangements!

The South American Regional Space Generation Workshop 2016 attendance is limited to 50 people, so only the most motivated applicants will attend.

If, for any reason, you require further assistance or confirmation, please let us know:

Camilo Andres Reyes – Delegate Team (该Email地址已收到反垃圾邮件插件保护。要显示它您需要在浏览器中启用JavaScript。 )

Ana Alexandra Perez – Delegate Team (该Email地址已收到反垃圾邮件插件保护。要显示它您需要在浏览器中启用JavaScript。 )

Gabriel Lapilli – Event Co-Manager (该Email地址已收到反垃圾邮件插件保护。要显示它您需要在浏览器中启用JavaScript。 )

Bruno Sarli – Event Manager (该Email地址已收到反垃圾邮件插件保护。要显示它您需要在浏览器中启用JavaScript。)

 

What is included in the SA-SGW 2016 application?

The SA-SGW includes the attendance to the Space Generation Workshop 2016 and the following points:

SA-SGW Delegate Handbook
SA-SGW Delegate Welcome Pack
SA-SGW Opening Dinner
SA-SGW Closing Dinner / Cultural Night
WIFI available at the venue
All Meals and Coffee breaks
Transportation to/from venue to restaurants
Speakers, Staff and material needed for the working groups
Your SA-SGW Badge, which will give you access to all of the above

 

What do I need to know about SA-SGW 2016?

You can find a link to the preliminary timetable of SA-SGW events. More info on the specific working group topics is available on this page. You should plan to arrive to Lima, Peru on July 31st, when we will have an optional welcome evening for all delegates and staff prior to the actual meeting days of August 1st and 2nd. The dress code for SA-SGW is business casual, however the dress code is formal clothing or your local national costume for the final closing dinner.

There is no specific packing list, but here are some things you might want to take:

Passport and Tourist VISA (if required)
A laptop computer for SA-SGW work (if you have one)
An electrical adapter to change voltage or shape connector for any appliances brought overseas
Notebook
Business cards

 

How much does it cost?

Registration for the SA-SGW 2016 event costs US$40 for registration. Keep in mind that all meals and transportation are fully included in this price for the entire workshop. We will be offering a few scholarships to cover the registration fee for those who need it most.

As we are a volunteer organization, any donation is a valuable contribution. Please use the donation button below to donate any amount you can spare for the SGAC SA-SGW, thank you!

In order to continue to organize initiatives in the South American region, SGAC kindly asks for donations from delegates. More information on how you can donate to SGAC activities in the South American region will be detailed in your SA-SGW confirmation letter, or can be found throughout this website.

 

What is my role?

As a participant of the SA-SGW 2016 You are entering into two days of dynamic debate on future regional collaboration in a unique, high-energy environment geared towards highly-motivated representatives like you. Over the two days, you will have the chance to express your ideas, network with people from around the region and the world, and meet today’s leaders in the regional and global space sector. 

The agenda includes panels, discussions, and working groups on current space topics. In the working groups segment, participants will collaborate with peers as well as experienced specialists on the topics:
  • Astrobiology Studies in South America 
  • South American Space Research 
  • Emerging spacefaring nations
  • Nanosatellites and Cubesats as an educational and research resource in South America
To conclude the workshop, the output from these working groups will be presented at the SA-SGW and further submitted as SGAC recommendations to United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UN COPUOS). The SA-SGW Organizing Team has put together this solid program for you all. We are here to help and please feel free to reach out to us, so we can help make your SA-SGW experience worthy of remembering

 

Travel

The best way to get to Lima is by arriving to its international airport. Jorge Chavez International Airport (LIM) known in Spanish as Aeropuerto Internacional Jorge Chavez is Peru’s main international and domestic airport. It is located in Callao, 11 kilometers (7 mi) from the center of Lima; however transportation between the airport and the city is provided by taxis, tour buses and vans. Depending on the departure region, the main airlines that fly to this location are the following:

Flying from North and Central America

  • Air Canada
  • Aeromexico
  • American Airlines
  • United
  • Delta

Flying from Europe

  • Iberia
  • Air France
  • KLM
  • Aireuropa

Flying from countries next-door:

  • LATAM Airlines Brasil
  • LATAM Airlines Group
  • Avianca

At the airport there is a travel information desk available named LAP information module, which is located at the international arrivals hall (first level), provides guidance and information to visitors during their stay in the terminal.

 

Accommodation

The following are a few local recommended options and are provided as information only. Neither SGAC nor the SA-SGW organizing team have made agreements or take responsibility for their service.

PALMETTO HOTEL BUSINESS SAN MIGUEL

Location: Av. La Marina 3691, San Miguel, San Miguel, 51 Lima, Peru

Price per night: USD$ 60

MACHU PICCHU SUITES

Location: Jirón Pichu 128, Maranga, San Miguel, San Miguel, Lima 32 Lima, Peru

Price per night: USD$ 55

SM HOTEL

Location: Av. De Los Patriotas 623, San Miguel, San Miguel, Lima 32 Lima, Peru

Price per night: USD$ 52

CASA AIKA

Location: Daniel Hernandez 612 Pueblo Libre, Pueblo Libre, Lima 21 Lima, Peru

Price per night: USD$ 40

MAGDALEN HOUSE

Location: Jr Ayacucho No 778-Magdalena del Mar, Lima, Peru

Price per night: USD$ 23

 

About Lima and Peru

Lima is one of the most interesting and challenging cities in South America with a huge archaeological, historical and cultural past. Most of its treasures might be well hidden, but are worth being discovered. Museums with great works of art, archaeological sites, beaches, the boardwalk, valleys, natural reserves, the nightlife, the thrill of adventure sports, and the exquisite cuisine gives Peru’s capital an authentic personality and makes tourism in Lima a unique experience in the country.

While in Lima, visitors will want to see the Church and monastery of San Francisco, the Palacio De Gobierno, San Martin Square, and the Gold Museum of Peru. Other sites rich in Peruvian history and culture include the Rafael Larco Herrera Museum, the National Museum of Anthropology and Archaeology, the National Museum of the Republic, the Museum of Peruvian Culture, and the Museum of the Inquisition. Parque Central is a relaxing out-door spot for visitors in the suburb of Miraflores.

Lima is not just the name of the capital of Peru. The district of Lima where the historical city center is located is called Lima. The region around it is called Lima. And to make it a little bit more complicated, Lima is also the name of the Province, located in the Department of Lima. Today Lima forms the region 'Lima Metropolitana'. It is divided into 43 districts.

Language

Spanish and Quechua, the language of the Incas, are the most widely spoken languages among “Limeños”. Spanish is the dominant language, while Quechua is mostly spoken throughout the Andes and by some people in Lima. Some migrants to the city speak Aymara, the second most important indigenous language in Peru.

Climate and Expected Weather

The average minimum temperatures for August in Lima are around 11-13°C, while average high temperatures oscillate around 20°C. The climate is relatively humid (70-100%), therefore it may feel colder than what it really is. We recommend bringing some warm clothes: A sweater during the day should be enough, and at night it would be advisable to have a jacket.

Currency & Banking

The local currency in Peru is the Nuevo Sol S/. (Sol means sun). You can exchange USA dollars or Euros at almost any place, banks, money changing offices, hotels, and restaurants. Beware of false notes. You are better off exchanging at money changing offices or banks. It is better to obtain your Soles in Peru than in your home country as you will obtain better exchange rates but beware of fraudulent notes and unofficial money traders offering you lucrative deals on the streets. Expect a rate around 0.30 US Dollars per Sol, or about 3.3 Soles per US Dollar.

 

Application

http://goo.gl/forms/PVf4PR84S6rUNLBD2

Working Group Topics

One of the primary components of the South American Space Generation Workshop (SA-SGW) are the working group sessions. Each delegate is assigned into one of four groups. The groups in the break-out sessions discuss a pertinent space topic, which is guided by Subject Matter Experts from the field, who will join these working groups to support them with knowledge to make the group discussions more fruitful. The preliminary conclusions of each group are presented to the rest of the delegates on the last afternoon of SA-SGW and the final conclusions are written into reports that are presented to the SGAC Executive Team, to be taken as recommendations in front of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space.

The four workshop topics of this year are:

  1. Astrobiology Studies in South America - what is the current status and how can worldwide presence be improved?
  2. South American Space Research - Is a common SA Open Space Research Database needed, feasible and realizable?
  3. Emerging spacefaring nations – What are viable pathways for their space development?
  4. Nanosatellites and Cubesats as an educational and research resource in South America - What venues are currently available to utilize them? What parties need to be involved and how can they foster the activity?

1.     Astrobiology Studies in South America - what is the current status and how can worldwide presence be improved?

South America provides unique environments for astrobiology researchers, yet the activity has limited support and faces organization challenges. Delegates will assess the current situation of astrobiology research in South America, identify its strengths and weaknesses, uniqueness and potential, proposing viable ways to strengthen the sector.

The Working Group can explore:

  • South American Institutions that currently conduct astrobiology research
  • Strong topics with worldwide relevance
  • Worldwide professional organizations

The Working Group can propose recommendations on:

  • Existing worldwide communities and institutions to create partnerships with
  • Regional events and networking possibilities

2.     South American Space Research - Is a common SA Open Space Research Database needed, feasible and realizable?

The spread of Internet allows a large community of researchers and students to be connected. For them, having easy access to state of the art research has a high relevance to develop new technologies and to improve current techniques in different space related fields. The working group should consider whether creating a common database for South American Space Research is needed, exploring existing options around the world. The group should also explore whether the Database is feasible to be created, what entity would manage it, under what legal framework, and how it could sustain its operations monetarily. Last but not least, explain how the database is expected to grow and what venues can be explored to extend its outreach to gather the maximum amount of work possible, creating a true international network.

The Working Group can explore:

  • Who are the potential users of the Database?
  • Who could manage the Database?
  • What legal considerations must be taken to publish papers? (Creative Commons, limited distribution, etc)

The Working Group can propose recommendations on:

  • Potential groups interested in pursuing the idea
  • Financial possibilities
  • Outreach options

3.        Emerging spacefaring nations – What are viable pathways for their space development?

The space sector development has been historically dominated by a few nations around the world. Commercialization of the entire space business is a relatively new activity that has helped reduce prices, allowing new players with smaller budgets reach the space sector. Delegates will explore different pathways that could make nations with emerging space sectors successful, sparking interest in their populations while gaining commercial and state support.

The Working Group can explore:

  • What is the current situation of the South American space sector?
  • What space activities are feasible to be developed by nations in the South America region?
  • How can the region create synergy between nations to complement their space growth?
  • Short, mid and long term plans
  • Advantages and disadvantages of the region in access to space

The Working Group can propose recommendations on:

  • Activities that are viable for countries of the region (launch services, nano and small satellites, large satellites, science payloads, etc)
  • Potential commercial companies that can benefit from operating in the region
  • Talent acquisition to strengthen the sector

4.         Nanosatellites and Cubesats as an educational and research resource in South America - What venues are currently available to utilize them? What parties need to be involved and how can they foster the activity?

Nanosatellites, particularly CubeSats, have become a valuable cost-effective tool for research and education, lowering the cost of access to space. Corporations have formed around the world to provide launch and commissioning services, regulators are looking at this new activity and space-developed countries have taken the lead on these tasks.

The use of Nanosatellites for educational/research purposes is seldom known or encouraged in the South American region, making them seem a distant choice, although it can be the most powerful resource to bring the space activity to everyone.

The Working Group can explore:

  • Challenges and opportunities for development of Nanosatellites/Cubesats in space-developed countries that can apply to the SA region
  • Potential uses, benefits and limitations      
  • Organizations in the region that currently work with them

The Working Group can propose recommendations on:

  • A detailed plan to improve the activity in the region
  • Organizations, agencies, individuals, companies that can/should collaborate
  • Potential business opportunities in the sector.

 

Workshop Program

Schedule subject to change. Last updated 12 July, 2016.

 

 

Venue

The SA-SGW 2016 takes place in the Auditorio Facultad de Derecho at the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú.

Av. Universitaria 1801, Distrito de Lima, Perú

 

Speakers

The following worldwide recognized professionals will support the working group discussions:

 

XIMENA ABREVAYA (ARGENTINA)

Ximena Abrevaya is Senior Research Scientist and Astrobiologist at Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (UBA – CONICET), in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Currently, she is leading the Argentinian Research Unit in Astrobiology (Núcleo Argentino de Investigación en Astrobiología). She obtained a PhD degree in Biological Sciences at University of Buenos Aires, with the first thesis in Astrobiology in Argentina. She obtained postdoctoral degrees at University of Buenos Aires and University of Sao Paulo, with studies focused in stellar astrophysics, microbiology and simulation of extraterrestrial environments in laboratory conditions. Her research interests are related to stellar radiation as a constraint for habiltability in planetary bodies of the Solar System and extrasolar planets, halophilic archaea as models in astrobiology, hypersaline environments as analogs of extraterrestrial environments , and methods for the in situ detection of extraterrestrial life, among others. She carries out interdisciplinary work combining astrophysical, biological and geological approaches and she is leading several national and international projects related to these topics in collaboration with researchers of multiple institutions.

 

ANDREW J. ALDRIN (USA)

Dr. Andrew Aldrin serves as the Director of the Buzz Aldrin Space Institute (BASI) and is an Associate Professor at Florida Institute of Technology. BASI is a multidisciplinary institute created to advance space exploration and development toward the goal of establishing and maintaining a permanent human presence on Mars. Prior to FIT, Dr. Aldrin was President of Moon Express, responsible for day to day operations for the company. Prior to Moon Express, Dr. Aldrin was Director of Business Development and Advanced Programs at United Launch Alliance where he oversaw development of corporate strategies, business capture, senior customer relations and advanced program development for civil space markets. Before ULA, Dr. Aldrin headed Business Development and Advanced Programs for Boeing’s NASA Systems, and Launch Services business units. He has also served as a Resident Consultant at the RAND Corporation and Professional Research Staff Member at the Institute for Defense Analyses. Dr. Aldrin holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from UCLA, an MBA from TRIUM, a MA in Science Technology and Public Policy from The George Washington University, and a MA in International Relations from the University of California at Santa Barbara. He is an Adjunct Faculty member at International Space University and has been Adjunct Faculty at the University of Houston and California State University at Long Beach. He has served as ShareSpace Vice Chairman since its inception in 1998

 

FRANCISCO CUELLAR (PERU)

Francisco Cuellar is a leader and developer of science, technology and innovation disruptive projects with industry and academy. He has solid and recognized experience with the mining, metal-mechanics, security, telecommunication, health and education industries. Currently he is the Director of the Center of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (CETAM), and an Associate Professor of the Engineering School of Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú (PUCP). Founder of the Group of Innovative Technology (GIT) at PUCP, which executes government funded innovation projects for the Industry (Innovate Perú), publishes scientific papers and generates intellectual property. He earned his Bachelor of Science in Electronics from PUCP, a Master of Science in Mechatronics from Kings College University of London, a Master on management and Politics of Innovation and Technology from PUCP, and is a PhD. candidate in Robotic Intelligent Systems at Osaka University.

 

ALEJANDRO DIAZ (PERU-USA)

Mr. Diaz is a Senior Spacecraft Systems Engineer in the Advanced Spacecraft Division of Boeing Phantom Works. In this capacity, he supports NASA's Commercial Crew Transportation (CCTS) program as the Ascent/Entry Suit (AES) Integration Lead, Water Recovery Trainer (WRT) Lead, Up-Righting System Lead, and Up-Righting System Test Director. Prior to his current assignment, Mr. Diaz supported NASA’s Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and International Space Station (ISS) programs. He is a Boeing Designated Expert (BDE) in the areas of EVA & Spacesuit Design and Operations. As part of the Boeing EVA Team, he was assigned as a SCUBA Diver and dove with astronaut crews in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) at NASA JSC in preparation for ISS Assembly Operations.

Mr. Diaz holds a Ph.D. in Astronautical Engineering from the University of Southern California (USC, 2012), an M.S. in Space Studies from the University of North Dakota (UND, 2009), an M.A. in Latin American Studies from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA, 2004), an M.S. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Southern California (USC, 2001), a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA, 1998), and he is a graduate of the International Space University’s Space Studies Program (SSP, 2002). Mr. Diaz received the NASA Space Flight Awareness Team Award in 2015 for his support to the Water Landing Development Test campaign at NASA LaRC, and was recognized in 2016 by the Rotary National Award for Space Achievement (RNASA) for his outstanding contributions to the nation in advancing space science and technology. Mr. Diaz has been a representative at Boeing-sponsored lobbying events in Washington D.C., where he met with key congressional representatives to promote Space Exploration; he is a graduate of Boeing’s High-Potential (HiPo) Three-Year Leadership Development Program (2011); he has commanded four Mars-analog crew missions at the Mars Desert Research Station; and he was selected by NASA as Finalist Interviewee (top 1%, 50 of 6,100 applicants) during NASA’s 2013 Astronaut Selection Process.

 

PRESTON FERGUSON (USA)

Mr. Preston Ferguson has worked at The Boeing Company since 1992. During this time, Mr. Ferguson has developed, assembled and tested experimental vehicles including DC-X/XA, X-33, Hyper-X, X-37, Orbital Express and CST-100. Mr. Ferguson is presently a member of Boeing's Advanced Space Exploration Division in Huntington Beach, CA. In this capacity, Mr. Ferguson supports NASA's Commercial Crew Transportation (CCTS) program, where he is the Landing Airbag System Lead.

Prior to his current assignment, Mr. Ferguson supported Ground Midcourse Defense (GMD) interceptor development and flight testing for the Missile Defense Agency (MDA). His primary experience includes advanced structures development, experimental vehicle design, system testing, and launch vehicle integration. Mr. Ferguson holds an M.B.A. in International Business from University of Redlands (2012), and a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from CSULB (1995).

 

PATRICK GRONNA (USA)

Mr. Patrick Gronna has worked for Boeing/NASA since January of 2015. During this time, Mr. Gronna has been involved with the fabrication, integration, and testing of the Landing Attenuation System of the Commercial Crew Transportation (CCTS) program.

Mr. Gronna has been an integral part of the success of the CST-100 Water Landing Development Test (WLDT) campaign at NASA LaRC, where he took proactive steps to ensure the successful completion of this major program milestone. In recognition of his dedication and efforts in support of the WLDT campaign, he received the Advanced Space Exploration (ASE) Division ‘Employee of the Month’ award in June 2015.

 He is also supporting the design and fabrication of BP-5, a high-fidelity CST-100 test article, which will be used for land landing qualification testing and later reconfigured into a water recovery trainer for astronauts to train egress operations. Mr. Gronna’s manufacturing and testing expertise is crucial to the successful development of BP-5.

Prior to his employment at Boeing, he was employed at Bigelow Aerospace. While at Bigelow, he was the Assembly and Integration Manager. In this capacity, he supported the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) program, developed ground support equipment (GSE), led the fabrication of several CST-100 full-scale test articles and test support equipment (i.e. mobile drop rig), and conducted CST-100 Landing & Recovery System development tests (i.e. landing airbag system, up-righting system, parachute system, forward heat shield separation, and water recovery crew egress).

His career goals are to apply his knowledge of assembly and integration of landing and recovery systems (LRS) to further NASA’s manned space program.

 

HERAUD PEREZ JORGE ARTURO (PERU)

Principal lecturer and researcher, Dr. Heraud is also Director of the Institute of Radio Astronomy of the PUCP and manages three major areas of research in space astrophysics and radio astronomy, Earth science and artificial satellites. It is about to complete the commissioning of an 8 meter radio telescope and has completed the design of a 20 meter radio telescope, the largest designed and built in Peru. With them, the study of radio galaxies and pulsar stars will be undertaken. Using the same radioscience techniques used to study deep space, it has allowed using emissions of electromagnetic pulses from the pressure in subduction zones to triangulate precursor earthquakes. In the last two years, more than a dozen earthquakes have been predicted with 15 days in advance. Peru is well ahead of the rest of the world and moves to help reverse the idea of ​​the impossibility of predicting earthquakes, a process of great social responsibility. Lately, the Institute achieved a three dimensional image of the subduction zone using the same data used for predictions. Finally, on November 21, 2013, the first two Peruvian satellites were put into orbit, after being designed, built and tested on the campus of the PUCP, becoming the Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru the first university in Latin America to successfully launch a satellite. Other research satellites continue strengthening the link between students and their commitment to research and experimentation.

 

ANDRES MARTINEZ (USA-MEXICO)

Andres Martinez is currently the NASA, Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Small Satellites Executive Program Officer and the deputy program manager for the NASA Small Spacecraft Technology Program (SSTP). AES is a division of the NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD). SSTP is one of nine programs within the NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD). At SSTP, Mr. Martinez oversees seven spaceflight projects, two of which have been launched already to space.

Mr. Martinez has over 26 years of experience as an engineer in Silicon Valley. He began his career at Xerox Corporation and spent 10 years working in various divisions, where he spent his last two years at the world-renowned Palo Alto Research Center (PARC). While at Xerox PARC, he co-founded an Internet start-up company, GroupFire Inc., in September of 1999, along with seven scientists and held an executive position – vice president of engineering. GroupFire, Inc. was eventually acquired by Google, Inc. in 2001. He has also held senior management positions at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Motorola, Inc. At LLNL, Mr. Martinez led a software development team. At Motorola, Inc., Mr. Martinez was Director of Program Management, leading a global team based in 12 different geographies with responsibilities for delivering new technologies for the cable industry.

Mr. Martinez joined NASA Ames Research Center in July 2007 as the Constellation Program Data Systems Lead for both the software development and systems engineering teams. Over the past eight years, Mr. Martinez has also been Program Manager for the Small Satellites Payloads and Technologies Program (SSPT) which included four space biology missions and the development of the Nanosatellite Launch Adapter System (NLAS). Recently, he has been Project Manager for two small-satellite space biology missions (SporeSat and MisST) and Deputy Project Manager for BioSentinel. Mr. Martinez was the SPHERES Program Manager for four years and also Project Manager for the first NASA sponsored-CubeSat jettisoned from the International Space Station (ISS) - TechEdSat-1. Mr. Martinez is also the NASA Ames Research Center technical point of contact for Latin America.

Mr. Martinez was honored as one of the “2015 Top 20 most influential Latinos in technology” by CNET en Español. He has been married for 29 years to his wife Olga and together have two children, Andres and Paulina, who are currently studying engineering.

Mr. Martinez earned a Baccalaureate in Science degree in Engineering from the California State Polytechnic University, Pomona.

 

CARLOS SAITO (PERU)

Professional Aeronautical Engineer graduated from the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA). Currently studying the Masters Degree of Engineering in Mechatronics at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Perú. More than 7 years of experience developing projects related to Unmanned Aerial Systems for the military and civilian industry. Researcher and Professor of The Unmanned Aerial Systems Research Group at Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú and Co-Founder and Chief Operations Officer at qAIRa.

 

JEFFREY SCOTT THON (USA)

Mr. Jeffrey Thon completed a BS/MS in Aerospace Engineering from Florida Tech in 2003, with an emphasis on Space Propulsion.  He started work in the Space Industry with USA (United Space Alliance) at the Kennedy Space Center in 2000 on the Space Shuttle SRB (Solid Rocket Booster) program.  He joined NASA in 2005 in the same capacity, but then started to branch out, and subsequently worked Space shuttle ET (External Tank) and Orbiter closeout and pyrotechnic operations.  When the shuttle retired in 2011, Mr. Thon joined the CCP (Commercial Crew Program) working as POC in Landing Systems testing for all commercial providers engaged in LEO capability development.  In 2014, four providers were down selected to two, Boeing and Space X, to complete their designs.  He was then selected to serve as the LRS (Landing and Recovery System) subsystem manager, responsible for each of these vehicle’s (Boeing Starliner and Space X Dragon 2) landing systems certification.

 

JACKELYNNE SILVA-MARTINEZ (PERU)

Jackelynne Silva-Martinez was born in Cusco, Peru. She attended elementary school, middle school and part of high school at different cities within Peru, including Cusco, Arequipa, and Lima.  She then moved to Paterson, NJ with her family and graduated from Eastside High School.  Jackelynne earned two bachelor degrees from Rutgers University; one in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and a second one in Spanish Translation and Interpretation. She worked for Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company as an Antennas Mechanical Design Engineer and as a Systems Integration and Test Engineer for commercial and government satellite programs.  She earned a Certificate in Lean Six Sigma from the Lockheed Martin Greenbelt Program, and a Certificate in Engineering Management from Drexel University. Jackelynne then worked as a Mechanical Engineer at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory on the Robotic Manipulators and Deployable Booms group performing verification and validation ground tests for the Mars Science Laboratory mission.  She obtained a Master's Degree in Aeronautical Science with concentration in Human Factors Aviation/Aerospace Systems from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.  Jackelynne is an alumna of the 2015 Space Studies Program from the International Space University, and currently completing a second Master’s Degree in Aerospace Engineering with concentration in Space Systems Integration at Georgia Institute of Technology.  She works at NASA Johnson Space Center in the ISS Mission Planning Operations within the Flight Operations Directorate.  Jackelynne is the founder of the Centro de Ciencia, Liderazgo y Cultura, which brings topics of science, leadership and culture to the young generation.  She and her husband have a son.  She enjoys reading, traveling, dancing, and learning from different cultures.  Her interests include human spaceflight, mission operations, space architecture, systems engineering, project management, STEM and STEAM initiatives.

 

JULIO VALDIVIA SILVA (PERU)

Medical Surgeon graduated from the National University of San Agustín de Arequipa, Peru. Ph.D. in Biological Sciences from the Institute of Nuclear Sciences and Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences from the Institute of Biomedical Sciences, both depending from the National Autonomous University of Mexico. Post-doctoral work in the Life Sciences and Astrobiology Division at NASA Ames Research Center - USA, and Stanford University - School of Medicine - USA, as well as the National Institute for Cancer Research (Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia) in  Mexico DF.

Participant in the Graduate Student Program of Singularity University in 2010 and program organizer of Future Med in 2012. Currently associate researcher at SETI (NASA), he returned to Peru under the INNOVATE Perú program, depending from the Ministry of Production. Manager coordinator of the Bioengineering degree career in the University of Engineering and Technology (UTEC).

 

Guest Speaker: BRANDON FERGUSON (USA)

Brandon is an award-winning science university student with a focus in planetary science. He also has acute knowledge of astronomy, physics, seismology, meteorology, rocketry, and geography. He attended Cal Poly San Luis Obispo his freshman year with a focus on physics. Then, in his sophomore and junior years, he attended Orange Coast College in Costa Mesa with a focus on geology and astronomy. He lectured on geologic principles for the 6th grade physical science class and presented for his college level planetary science course on exoplanetary systems as well as potential planet habitability. He currently attends Cal Poly Pomona as a Bachelor of Science Geology major and runs on school’s NCAA Cross Country and Track and Field Team.

 

Mr. Diaz is
a Senior Spacecraft Systems Engineer in the Advanced
Spacecraft Division of Boeing Phantom Works. In this capacity, he
supports NASA's Commercial Crew Transportation (CCTS) program as
the Ascent/Entry Suit (AES) Integration Lead, Water Recovery Trainer
(WR
T) Lead, Up
-
Righting System Lead, and Up
-
Righting System Test
Director. Prior to his current assignment, Mr. Diaz supported NASA’s Crew
Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and International Space Station (ISS)
programs. He is a Boeing Designated Expert (BDE) in the
areas of EVA &
Spacesuit Design and Operations. As part of the Boeing EVA Team, he
was assigned as a SCUBA Diver and dove with astronaut crews in the
Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) at NASA JSC in preparation for ISS
Assembly Operations.
Mr. Diaz holds a
Ph.D. in Astronautical Engineering from the University of Southern California (USC,
2012), an M.S. in Space Studies from the University of North Dakota (UND, 2009), an M.A. in Latin
American Studies from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA, 20
04), an M.S. in Aerospace
Engineering from the University of Southern California (USC, 2001), a B.S. in Aerospace
Engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA, 1998), and he is a graduate of
the International Space University’s Space St
udies Program (SSP, 2002). Mr. Diaz received the
NASA Space Flight Awareness Team Award in 2015 for his support to the Water Landing
Development Test campaign at NASA LaRC, and was recognized in 2016 by the Rotary National
Award for Space Achievement (RNAS
A) for his outstanding contributions to the nation in advancing
space science and technology. Mr. Diaz has been a representative at Boeing
-
sponsored lobbying
events in Washington D.C., where he met with key congressional representatives to promote Space
Ex
ploration; he is a graduate of Boeing’s High
-
Potential (HiPo) Three
-
Year Leadership Development
Program (2011); he has commanded four Mars
-
analog crew missions at the Mars Desert Research
Station; and he was selected by NASA as Finalist Interviewee (top 1%
, 50 of 6,100 applicants) during
NASA’s 2013 Astronaut Selection Process.
Event Manager: Bruno Sarli (Brazil, South-America Regional Coordinator)
Event Co-Manager: Gabriel Lapilli (Argentina)
Logistics Team: Oscar Ojeda, Camilo Andrés Molina, Natalia Vargas Cuentas
Delegate Team: Ana Alexandra Pérez, Camilo Andrés Reyes
Communication Team: Giancarlo Villena, Kimberly Carolina Castro, Elizabeth Margaret Centurion, Jénory Celeste Balladares
Local Organizing Team: Mónica Lucia Abarca, Diego Alonso Guillén, Roberto Adolfo Ubidia, Jeel Moya-Salazar, Sergio Renato Postigo
Program Team: Romulo Leoncio Cruz, Avid Roman-Gonzalez, Ruth Estefany Quispe
SGAC Executive Office: Stephanie Wan (Chair, USA), Ali Nasseri (Co-Chair, USA), Minoo Rathnasabapathy (Executive Director, Australia), Jacob Hacker (Treasurer, Australia)

National Point of Contacts of South America Region:

Federico Perazzo (Argentina), Santiago Enriquez (Argentina), Natalia Indira Vargas-Cuentas (Bolivia), Paola Andrea Escobari Vargas (Bolivia), Josue dos Santos (Brazil), Brehme Dnapoli Reis de Mesquita (Brasil),  Diego Jimenez (Colombia), Diego Alejandro Albarracin Gonzalez (Colombia), Mónica Abarca (Peru), Giancarlo Villena (Peru).

The South American Space Generation Workshop (SA-SGW) is a two-day regional workshop for university students and young professionals in the South America region in conjunction with the 1st Latin American Congress of Astrobiology held in Lima, Peru on August 1st – 2nd 2016.
During the SA-SGW 2016, delegates have a unique opportunity to engage with high level space sector leaders, professionals and academics. The agenda includes panels, discussions, and working groups on current space topics. In the working groups segment, participants will collaborate with peers as well as experienced specialists on the topics of:

  • Astrobiology Studies in South America
  • South American Space Research
  • Emerging spacefaring nations
  • Nanosatellites and Cubesats as an educational and research resource in South America

To conclude the workshop, the output from these working groups will be presented at the SA-SGW and further submitted as SGAC recommendations to United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UN COPUOS).

South American Regional
Space Generation Workshop 2016

The next generation for the development of space activities in South America

1 - 2 August, 2016
Lima, Peru

Delegate Handbook is now available for download: [PDF 2.2 MB]


 Watch the webcast here!


The Second South American Space Generation Workshop (SA-SGW) is a two-day regional workshop for university students and young professionals in the South America region. in conjunction with the 1rs Latinoamerican Astrobiology Congress held in Lima, Peru on August 1st – 7th 2015.

Peru is the third largest country in the South American continent after Brazil and Argentina, and it is among the 20 largest countries in the world. Peru has got his National Commission for Aerospace Research and Development (CONIDA), which is responsible for all space related activities in the country, include: Propulsion, Geomatics, Rocketry, Astronomy, Scientific Instrumentation. Furthermore, Peru is a chapter of the Mars Society and they do research in Astrobiology and Space Settlements in the peruvian dessert.

Peru has recently experienced an important growth in the space sector. Only in the last couple of year, four Peruvian nano-satellites (made by students and professors from three main Peruvian universities), were put it in orbit. The PUCP-SAT 1 and POCKET-PUCP (Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru) in 2013, the UAPSAT-I (Universidad Alas Peruanas) in 2014, and the CHASQUI-I (Universidad Nacional de Ingeniería) also in 2014, represent the efforts of the academia sector for create space capabilities and develop necessary skills within the country. 

Due to this, during the 2nd SA-SGW, delegates have a unique opportunity to engage with high level space sector leaders, professionals and academics. The main objectives of this event are the following:

  • To strengthen the regional network of students and young professionals in the South American region.
  • To examine and consider key questions in the South American region that the regional space community is facing and to provide inputs from the next generation the space professionals.
  • To allow tomorrow’s space sector leaders in the South American region to have the opportunity to interact with today’s space leaders and professionals in the region through the cooperation with regional and international institutions.

To conclude the workshop, the output from these working groups will be presented at the SA-SGW and further submitted as SGAC recommendations to United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UN COPUOS).


 Want to join?

Click here to apply!

NOTE: Read all necessary information about SA-SGW can be found in the Delegate Information section on the right side of this site.


Panorama of Lima - Peru

SA-SGW and the SGAC

SA-SGW 2016 in conjunction with the 1st Latinoamerican Astrobiology Congress follows up the successful regional SGAC workshop, the 1st European Space Generation Workshop, held in February 26-27 2016. SGAC is looking forward to keep the focus in South America. SA-SGW will be the second SGAC regional event in South America, first version was held in May 2015 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. South America is a region developing advanced space technology, enhancing economic and human resources, and building international space cooperation. SA-SGW will engage tomorrow's space sector leaders in the region; the workshop will provide an ideal platform for delegates to have the opportunity to voice their opinions, exchange ideas on these pertinent issues, and network. Aside from developing compelling and innovative policy recommendations on pressing space issues, the SGAC also fosters a unique environment of students, young professionals, academia, agency and industry. SA-SGW looks to emulate that success and focus in on the key South America region, which will be the largest growing space region in terms of space technology utilization and development within the next decade. By developing a critical focus, SA-SGW seeks to ensure that serious questions about competition, co-operation and peaceful uses of outer space are discussed by those who will lead industry and agency in this region in the future.


Questions

If you have any questions about your application to the 2nd SA-SGW, please contact the Delegate Team of the SA-SGW Organizing Team.

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该Email地址已收到反垃圾邮件插件保护。要显示它您需要在浏览器中启用JavaScript。SA-SGW Manager & Regional Coordinator South America

 


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